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There’s still no consent decree for police reform in Chicago, which means no federal judge or independent monitor is tracking the city’s progress toward change. So The Chicago Reporter is monitoring the city’s implementation of the 99 recommendations for reform set out by the U.S. Department of Justice.

In January 2017, days before the sun set on the Obama presidency, the Justice Department published a scathing report on what it called “systemic deficiencies” in the Chicago Police Department and urged the city to enter into a consent decree to work toward its recommended reforms. The DOJ’s yearlong investigation, sparked by public outcry over the Laquan McDonald police shooting video, was the most comprehensive and authoritative analysis to date of bias, excessive force and lack of accountability within CPD.

But under the Trump administration, the Justice Department has backed off of its January commitment to negotiate a court-enforceable consent decree. Mayor Rahm Emanuel wavered on the need for a consent decree, which would include a concrete timeline and a court-appointed independent monitor to measure progress, before finally being forced to come to the table by Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan in late August.

Even with a commitment from the mayor to work toward a consent decree, the negotiations could take months, and the appointment of an independent monitor is likely even farther off. In the meantime, The Chicago Reporter is acting as a public monitor, using the city’s public statements, our own reporting and that of other news organizations. Check back here regularly for updates on the city’s progress toward enacting the DOJ’s 99 recommendations for police reform.

So far, Chicago has implemented 6 of the DOJ’s 99 recommendations

Implemented
Partially implemented
Planned
Not implemented
Unclear
6recommendations
23recommendations
17recommendations
29recommendations
24recommendations

Last updated September 15, 2017.

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Showing 99 of 99 recommendations.

Improve timeliness and quality of BIA and COPA investigations

🔗

“Improve the timeliness and quality of BIA/IPRA/COPA investigations through the creation of case management protocols, including streamlined procedures and target deadlines for the completion of investigations.”

  • September 15, 2017

    According to the new “data dashboard” on COPA’s website, the average age of a pending investigation as of September 5 was 443 days, or more than 14 months. The ordinance that created COPA requires that the agency provide notification for any pending investigation that is older than six months. As of September 5, according to the website, there were more than 500 pending cases that were more than six months old, including at least 17 cases that were more than five years old.
  • July 12, 2017

    Both COPA and BIA have pledged to increase timeliness of their investigations, and to provide transparency about how many investigations are taking longer than 90 days. But neither agency has yet released that information.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
September 15, 2017

Track, analyze and publish data to identify discriminatory patterns

🔗

“Collect and analyze enforcement data (including use of force data) to identify patterns of unequal enforcement on the basis of race or ethnicity, and devise and implement operational changes based on this analysis. Publish stop, search, arrest, and force data bi-annually with the analysis of trends, and the steps taken to correct problems and build on successes.”

  • August 30, 2017

    CPD has not proactively released any data on stops, searches, arrests, or uses of force. In the March framework for reform, CPD pledged to release a 2016 annual report with crime and other data for all districts, but as of the end of August, it has not yet done so.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 30, 2017

Provide recurring training on bias-based policing

🔗

“Provide initial and recurring training to all officers that sends a clear and consistent message that bias-based profiling and other forms of discriminatory policing are prohibited, and ensures that officers are capable of interacting with and providing services to all communities.”

  • August 25, 2017

    To date, 10,950 officers (90 percent of the force) have completed Procedural Justice 1 training and 5,034 (40 percent) have completed Procedural Justice 2, according to CPD. The department says it expects to launch part three of the training, which covers implicit bias, in spring 2018.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to continue to provide Procedural Justice 1 and Procedural Justice 2 training modules to all officers, supervisors and command staff. The department also pledged to develop a third Procedural Justice course that it would begin pilot testing in 2018. In January, the Sun-Times reported that more than 11,200 officers, nearly the entire force, had already taken the procedural justice training.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Communicate better with officers about merit promotions

🔗

“Devise and implement mechanisms for teaching officers about the policies and procedures guiding the merit promotion process.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it has “revised training materials to emphasize that recommendations [for merit promotions] be based upon personal knowledge and experience.”
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to clearly communicate to officers about the merit promotion process, to revise the training materials for CPD members making merit promotion recommendations and provide retraining on merit promotions to command staff involved in those decisions on a periodic basis.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Implemented
Category
Promotions
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Publish regular public reports on crime trends and policing activities

🔗

“Develop and implement policies mandating regular public reporting of crime trends and CPD policing activities.”

  • August 25, 2017

    As of late August, the department still hadn’t published the 2016 annual report. CPD said it would release the annual report in September.
  • March 14, 2017

    In its March framework for reform, CPD promised to publish a 2016 annual report with crime statistics and other data for all districts, which a spokesman had earlier said would be completed by the end of February. CPD last published an annual report in 2010.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Analyze data for trends and patterns

🔗

“Develop systems to ensure that data is appropriately and timely analyzed to identify trends or patterns in policing activities, including officer use of force and police misconduct complaints. The City and CPD should use data collection systems to track and identify patterns or practices of constitutional violations, so that corrective action can be taken where necessary.”

  • August 25, 2017

    The city’s law and finance departments have continued to resist analyzing police misconduct lawsuits for trends and patterns that might merit corrective action. Laura Kunard, who in April was appointed deputy inspector general for public safety and is tasked with reviewing and auditing the entire police accountability system, has yet to publish any reports. CPD says it is “initiating efforts” to improve its use-of-force data collection and analysis, but the department has not provided a timeline.
  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD committed to “improving its capacity to track and analyze uses of force by CPD personnel.” The department said it would analyze existing data analysis capacities by the end of 2017 and enlist outside consultants to make recommendations for new data collection.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • Law Department
  • Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety
Status
Not implemented
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Provide better evaluation and treatment for officers who witness traumatic events

🔗

“Revise and implement new protocols for evaluation and treatment of officers involved in, or who witness, traumatic events, not limited to officer-involved shootings.”

  • August 25, 2017

    In August, CPD said, “Following national best practices, the Department will provide increased support for members involved in or witness to official and unofficial traumatic events.” But it did not provide any details or further information about what that support would consist of.
  • May 1, 2017

    At a subject matter hearing in City Council in May, Dr. Rob Sobo, CPD’s director for professional counseling services, said officers are required to come in for a debriefing after an officer-involved shooting. But Ald. Chris Taliaferro, a former police officer, quipped that officers have said these sessions consist of “just sitting there in a cubicle for a while.” Dr. Sobo did not announce any new protocols for how officers are evaluated and treated after traumatic events, or any plans to expand these required sessions beyond just officer-involved shootings.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve communication with CPD members about the Employee Assistance Program

🔗

“Coordinate a communication strategy to inform all CPD members of the services available through the Employee Assistance Program and ensure that references to the range of available counseling and support services are included in Academy trainings, including the stress management and wellness trainings.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD reported that Dr. Rob Sobo, who heads the Employee Assistance Program, now speaks to every recruit class about the EAP and support services available to officers.
  • May 1, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to create a coordinated communications strategy to better inform CPD members of the Employee Assistance Program. At a subject matter hearing at City Council in May, Deputy Chief Barbara West again noted that the department was “trying to promote” these services. But it was clear that there is not yet a coordinated communications strategy.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Conduct needs assessment for officer wellness resources

🔗

“Conduct a needs assessment to determine what additional resources officers desire or need to reduce the stressors of their jobs.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD worked with clinicians to develop a needs assessment survey, which was sent out to officers in August. The Department pledged to release more information about the survey and the results in the coming weeks.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD committed in March to conducting a review of the support services available to officers and, with officer and expert input, developing a plan for enhancing officer support.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve training for new supervisors and in-service training for all supervisors

🔗

“Provide new supervisors with adequate training on supervisory skills, including leadership and management, and provide all supervisors with regular training on issues relevant to their supervisory responsibilities.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it will conduct a review of the training provided to newly promoted supervisory members, beginning in fall 2017.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD committed in March to improving sergeant training to focus on the issues highlighted by the DOJ.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Supervision
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve supervisor-to-officer ratios in all districts

🔗

“Implement appropriate span-of-control ratios in all districts and reform shift scheduling to allow for unity of command.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD contracted with Alexander Weiss, a policing expert, to conduct an analysis of CPD’s deployment and span-of-control, the ratio of officers to supervisors. The department says it plans to identify 44 sergeant positions that can be filled by civilians by December 2017, which will move more sergeants to districts to improve span-of-control.
  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD pledged to add 37 additional sergeants, 50 lieutenants, 200 detectives and 92 field training officers in 2017, in addition to filling existing vacancies. The department also committed to conducting a span-of-control study to determine the department’s deployment and supervision needs.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Supervision
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Add instructors and improve instructor training and evaluation

🔗

“Recruit, hire, and train additional instructors, and develop and implement rigorous testing, evaluation, and training of all instructors to ensure subject-matter competency and skill in instruction.”

  • August 25, 2017

    Since March, CPD says it has recruited more than 50 new instructors to deliver Academy training. This includes 30 volunteer instructors who have been implementing the training on the department’s new use-of-force policy. CPD says it is working on recruiting and training additional instructors and is considering a system to evaluate instructors, which it says is planned for spring 2018.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to improve instructor recruitment and evaluation.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Training
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Implement a mandatory in-service training program

🔗

“Implement a mandatory in-service training program, based on a comprehensive evaluation of Department needs, that includes high quality training through live, scenario-based trainings; provides updates on law and Department policy; and presents officers and supervisors with opportunities to refresh important skills and tactics.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD reported that it has begun reviewing in-service training “to ensure compliance with state requirements and inclusion of adult learning principles.” It did not provide a timeline for when that review would be finished. The department also reported that it developed a two-part training on two new Illinois laws that affect CPD’s procedures for assisting sexual assault victims and processing juveniles arrested for certain crimes.
  • May 19, 2017

    The superintendent created a training oversight committee. Among its duties and responsibilities, the committee will develop a strategic plan to decentralize in-service trainings to the district and unit level. The plan will include a selection process so that district supervisors can become trained instructors. The committee will develop a review and audit procedure to ensure consistency across districts.
  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD pledged to reform the structure of its in-service training, based on officers’ needs and desires. The department also created a new training oversight committee, which it said would be responsible for evaluating the needs for ongoing in-service training and creating a new in-service training program.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Training
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve Field Training program

🔗

“Revitalize CPD’s Field Training Program by increasing incentives provided to [Field Training Officers] in order to ensure a sufficient number of high-quality FTOs; improving the training provided to FTOs and, in turn, the quality of supervision and guidance that FTOs provide; creating a standardized curriculum for each FTO to use when training [Probationary Police Officers]; increasing the rigor of FTO evaluation of PPOs; creating better supervision of FTOs and regularly evaluating the Field Training Program to identify areas in need of improvement.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD reported that it conducted refresher training for 166 Field Training Officers (FTOs) and recruited and trained 90 new FTOs in the spring and summer. The department also created a Field Training Section in the Bureau of Patrol to improve supervision and oversight of FTOs and dedicated an FTO sergeant in each district. In addition, the department decided that Probationary Police Officers will remain in their districts for three additional months after the end of their field training cycles so they can be formally evaluated on their performance. There is also an FTO subcommittee on the Training Oversight Committee, which will evaluate and recommend further improvements to the FTO training curriculum.
  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD committed to many of the DOJ’s recommendations regarding the FTO program, including better screening for FTOs, better supervision, and upgrading the system for evaluating both FTOs and PPOs.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Implemented
Category
Training
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Update Academy curricula and lesson-delivery methods

🔗

“Revise Academy curricula and lesson content to ensure consistency with CPD policy and current law, particularly with respect to the use of force, and revise lesson-delivery methods to include lessons that are consistent with adult learning principles and include more scenario-based trainings.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it has solicited input from national experts on its Academy training and conducted focus groups of officers to solicit feedback on training, including on the new four-hour use-of-force training. The department has added members to the Academy’s Instructional Design and Quality Control section, which writes and reviews Academy training. CPD has also added courses on relevant Illinois case law and a refresher course on filling out investigatory stop reports. But much of the new training continues to be video-based, rather than scenario-based, and the department is short on specifics about changes to Academy curricula and lesson-delivery methods.
  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD pledged to increase the use of instructional materials that incorporate adult-learning principles and to use more scenario-based training.
  • February 8, 2017

    ABC7 reported that CPD has stopped using a video made 35 years ago, which the DOJ called “inconsistent with both current law and CPD’s own policies,” to teach use-of-force techniques. It is unclear from the news report what CPD has replaced it with, or whether it has followed the rest of DOJ’s recommendation on lesson content and instruction methods.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Training
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve command channel review process for discipline

🔗

“Revise how disciplinary decisions are made, including streamlining the number of disciplinary decision-makers and the layers of review of disciplinary recommendations, to facilitate quicker final resolution of complaints.”

  • August 25, 2017

    In May 2017[a], CPD says it changed the length of time for each stage of the command channel review process from 30 days to 15 days, in an attempt to speed up the conclusion of disciplinary investigations. Buta review of the updated special order shows the department did not significantly change this process, by which the outcome of a disciplinary investigation is reviewed—and can be changed—by supervisors in the officer’s chain of command.
  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD pledged to examine the disciplinary review process and to consider replacing the command channel review process with an alternative system.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Develop training for investigators, police board members, and hearing officers

🔗

“Develop and implement mandatory and comprehensive training for BIA/IPRA/COPA investigators, Police Board members, and hearing officers on police practices, civil rights law, evidence collection and assessment techniques, interview techniques, and other pertinent issues. The training for IPRA/COPA investigators should also include training on implicit bias and proper witness interviewing techniques. Investigators tasked with investigating domestic violence and sexual misconduct complaints should receive specialized training on the dynamics of those incidents and interview techniques for domestic violence and sexual misconduct victims.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD reported that BIA sent all sergeants to detective training at the academy in February 2017 to “improve the capacity of investigators in BIA.”
  • July 11, 2017

    COPA announced that the first cohort of 36 investigative and legal staff had graduated from the COPA Academy training program.
    BIA has not provided any more information on the additional training provided to their investigators.
    The police board has participated in the rollout of CPD’s new use of force training and is scheduled to participate in simulation deadly force training before the end of the year.
  • May 25, 2017

    COPA announced the launch of COPA Academy, a six-week training program for all new investigative and legal staff. The curriculum includes topics such as complaint intake, investigative steps and logic, case management, use of force, forensic evidence and analysis, and implicit bias.
  • March 14, 2017

    The March framework for reform pledged additional training for BIA investigators, but it was far from comprehensive. The framework noted that the department was sending BIA investigators to detective training and that they would be trained in conducting investigations concurrently with criminal investigations. No other specific training was mentioned.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
  • Police Board
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Collect data on Crisis Intervention Team calls

🔗

“Collect data on CIT calls to allow CPD to make informed decisions about staffing and deployment so that a CIT officer is available for all shifts in all districts to respond to every CIT call.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it designated a lieutenant as a Crisis Intervention Coordinator, responsible for both coordinating CIT training and leading the Critical Response Unit (CRU), a team responsible for working with other city agencies to manage the city’s response to people experiencing mental health crises. The department says the CRU will take on responsibility for collecting and analyzing data on mental health crises and CPD’s response, but it did not provide a timeline or mandate public reporting.
  • June 16, 2017

    When The Chicago Reporter wrote about this issue in April 2015, the department was not able to provide data on how many crisis-related calls were responded to by CIT-trained officers, because the calls are tracked by the Office of Emergency Management and Communications and the officers by CPD. But in testimony before Congress in April 2014, then-First Deputy Superintendent Al Wysinger said “fewer than a majority” of mental-health calls were responded to by a CIT officer. The DOJ report noted that, due to better identification of mental health-related calls, the number of CIT calls increased fivefold from 2015 to 2016. If better figures on CIT calls exist now, CPD has not released them.
Agency responsible
  • OEMC
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Ensure adequate CIT officer staffing

🔗

“Ensure that there are enough CIT officers on duty throughout the City and throughout the day to help ensure a CIT officer is available to respond to calls involving an individual in crisis.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD reported that 2,278 CPD officers had been trained as Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) specialists as of August, practically unchanged from the 2,200 they said had been trained through 2016.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to expand the number of CIT officers, which stood at the time at 2,200, but it did not provide a timeline or a specific goal of the number of officers it needs. CPD also did not commit to the DOJ recommendations to ensure that there are enough officers throughout the day to ensure a CIT-trained officer is available to respond to all calls involving an individual in crisis.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve crisis intervention training for CIT officers

🔗

“Provide crisis intervention training to CIT-designated officers, who will respond to critical incidents involving persons in crisis. This training should include how to identify and respond to common medical emergencies that may at first appear to reflect a failure to comply with lawful orders (e.g., seizures, diabetic emergencies).”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it is reviewing the 40-hour Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training, with “curriculum updates expected by the end of the year,” though it is unclear what those updates will entail.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Screen officers more thoroughly for CIT program

🔗

“Screen and designate volunteer officers who have expressed an interest in becoming CIT specialists and are well-suited to this work. CPD should continue to offer CIT training for officers who wish to develop crisis intervention skills, but reserve participation in the CIT program to the selected officers.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it is attempting to grow the number of Crisis Intervention Team specialists “strategically,” but did not provide details on what that means or whether additional screening has been implemented.
  • March 14, 2017

    Officers who volunteer for CIT training “are more likely to have a deeper interest in and commitment to working with people in crisis.” The DOJ cautioned that expanding the CIT program to officers who are not properly screened—and, in some cases, making it mandatory—is “unlikely to achieve the City’s goal of improved crisis intervention response.” CPD pledged in March to expand the number of CIT officers, which stood at the time at 2,200, but it did not commit to changing the way it screens or recruits officers to the program.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Devote appropriate resources to the CIT program

🔗

“Devote appropriate resources to improve CPD’s existing [Crisis Intervention Team] program. Develop and implement policy and training to better identify and respond to individuals with known or suspected mental health conditions, including persons in mental health crisis and those with intellectual or developmental disabilities (“I/DD”) or other disabilities.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD reported that 2,278 CPD officers had been trained as Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) specialists as of August, practically unchanged from the 2,200 they said had been trained through 2016. In June, CPD launched a pilot program in the 19th District, creating a Mental Health Resource Officer (MHRO) position, who serves as a resource to CIT officers and helps connect individuals with mental illness to services. The Department says it plans to eventually roll out this program to all districts.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged to devote additional staff and resources to the CIT program. The department was vague about the details of how many new officers would be trained or what additional resources would be allocated.
  • February 25, 2017

    All 911 operators received an eight-hour course in mental health awareness and crisis intervention so they could better identify and notify officers about situations involving mental illness, the Chicago Tribune reported in February.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • OEMC
Status
Planned
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Prohibit involved and witness officers from colluding after officer-involved shootings

🔗

“Adopt policies and practices that preclude involved and witness officers from speaking with one another, or with civilian witnesses, about the shooting incident until after they have been interviewed by IPRA investigators, except to the extent necessary to ensure public safety. To that end, require that, where possible, involved officers, witness officers, and civilian witnesses be transported to the station separately and their conversations be monitored to avoid contamination prior to interviews.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD committed to this recommendation in March. The department says it is in the process of updating its policies on investigating officer-involved shootings, and plans to release the revised version in October.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Planned
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Collect better data on uses of force

🔗

“Collect and analyze data on uses of force to identify racial and other disparities in officer uses of force.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says the information services division is developing plans for “new, integrated data systems” to better track use of force.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD committed to improving its capacity to track and analyze uses of force by the end of 2017. It promised to establish a working group or task force to make recommendations for a new system. But so far, no new data collection system has been announced.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Improve supervisory review of uses of force

🔗

“Develop and implement supervisory review of force that requires the supervisor to conduct a complete review of each use of force, including gathering and considering evidence necessary to understand the circumstances of the force incident and determine its consistency with law and policy, including statements from individuals against whom force is used and civilian witnesses.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD is training supervisors how to fill out the new Tactical Response Report (TRR) in a one-hour training on supervising use of force. The training is expected to be completed in October 2017.
  • May 17, 2017

    The new CPD use of force policy requires supervisors to respond to the scene when force has been used, more carefully review TRRs for accuracy and completeness, ensure that witnesses are identified and interviewed, and ensure that all required notifications and reports are made. The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Train officers in sound tactics to avoid unnecessary uses of force

🔗

“Ensure that officers are trained in sound tactics to avoid unnecessarily exposing officers to situations in which deadly force may become necessary.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it commenced a review of its Tactical Training Unit program, which includes courses on entry tactics and the use of Tasers. But the status of this review—and whether any changes have been made to this training—remains unclear.
  • July 27, 2017

    In its 2008-09 annual report, the Independent Police Review Authority noted a trend of police shootings that resulted from problematic foot pursuits. IPRA suggested improved training for officers on “maintaining contact with partners, recognizing and assessing potential dangers, finding ways to increase one’s tactical advantage, and using assisting units to contain and assist in pursuing multiple suspects.” Yet the DOJ report found many of these same tactical issues still exist. CPD has not announced any changes to tactical training for officers.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Develop foot pursuit policy

🔗

“Develop, train and implement a foot pursuit policy that makes clear that foot pursuits are dangerous and that sets forth guidelines for foot pursuits that balance the objective of apprehending the suspect with the risk of potential injury to the officer, the public, and the suspect. The policy also should address unsafe foot pursuit tactics to ensure the risks of foot pursuits are not increased.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD does not have a written department policy or directive regarding foot pursuits. CPD says it is developing an “educational bulletin” on foot pursuit tactics to be distributed within the department.
  • March 14, 2017

    The DOJ found that many fatal police shootings began with foot pursuits that were either unnecessary or tactically unsound (or both). A 2016 Chicago Tribune investigation found that one-third of police shootings from 2010 to 2015 resulted from a foot chase. In March, CPD committed to developing a training module to address proper foot pursuit tactics.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Train officers in de-escalation

🔗

“CPD has begun training officers in safely using de-escalation methods so that force may be avoided. CPD should continue this process and should incorporate these concepts throughout CPD training.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD says it has interviewed additional instructors for the force mitigation training and plans to launch an additional shift of this training in fall 2017.
  • March 14, 2017

    As of March, approximately 1,000 CPD officers, or just 8 percent of the force, had completed the 16-hour de-escalation training, according to CPD.
  • September 16, 2016

    In September 2016, CPD rolled out new de-escalation training, and set an ambitious goal to train every officer in force mitigation tactics within a year, according to the Chicago Tribune.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Revise use of force policies

🔗

“CPD has begun the process of revising its force policies to better reflect the sanctity of human life, the need to avoid the use of force, and de-escalation and force mitigation consistent with officer safety. CPD should continue this process to ensure these concepts are incorporated throughout CPD’s force policies, including its canine and Taser policies, and that policies provide sufficient guidance to officers.”

  • August 25, 2017

    CPD has been training officers on its revised use of force policy since July. The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives because officers are still being trained on it. All officers are expected to have completed the four-hour training by October 2017.
  • May 17, 2017

    In May, Supt. Johnson released the final use of force policies, closely mirroring the March version, with guidelines that any force used be “objectively reasonable, necessary, and proportional” but without the original requirement that officers use the “least amount of force reasonably necessary.” The new policy highlights the sanctity of life and encourages the use of de-escalation techniques, as recommended by the DOJ.
  • March 6, 2017

    In March 2017, after criticism of the first draft from both the police unions and police reform advocates, Supt. Eddie Johnson released a revised draft policy that scaled back some of the changes made in the first draft. The revised draft was “a shift in tone and policy,” the Chicago Tribune reported, by emphasizing officer safety and removing a provision that would have required officers to use the least amount of force necessary.
  • October 7, 2016

    In October 2016, before the DOJ report became public, CPD released a draft use of force policy that put sanctity of human life first and foremost, emphasized de-escalation, and placed new restrictions on when officers are allowed to use force. The DOJ report commended CPD on its efforts to address some of the problems with the old use of force policy, but cautioned that the revised policy does not fix “deficient procedures” for reporting and investigating use of force.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 25, 2017

Equip all officers and supervisors with body cameras

🔗

“Equip all patrol officers and supervisors, and officers who regularly interact with the public, including tactical officers, with body cameras, and develop a body camera policy delineating officers’ responsibilities regarding the consistent and appropriate use of body cameras and the retention and review of body camera footage.”

  • August 21, 2017

    The city announced three more districts would be receiving body cameras: Chicago Lawn (8th), Park Manor (3rd), and Grand Central (25th). The city says all patrol officers on all watches will have body cameras by the end of 2017.
  • June 12, 2017

    In June, the city announced that the Harrison (11th) District had become the 11th police district in the city to receive body cameras. That means the city is halfway toward its goal of equipping all 22 districts by the end of 2017.
  • December 28, 2016

    In December 2016, CPD announced plans to accelerate the rollout of body cameras, setting an ambitious goal to equip every patrol officer with a body camera by the end of 2017. At the time, CPD officers in seven districts had body cams. CPD did not provide a precise timeline for how the body cameras would be rolled out to the remaining districts.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
August 21, 2017

Synthesize city and CPD data collection systems

🔗

“Create a plan to improve and synthesize City and CPD data collection systems by dates certain.”

  • August 16, 2017

    No updates or commitments to this recommendation have been provided to date.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • City Information Technology Department
Status
Unclear
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
August 16, 2017

Examine data collection mechanisms for gaps and inconsistencies

🔗

“Examine and evaluate current data collection mechanisms and technology to determine where there are gaps and inefficiencies.”

  • August 16, 2017

    No updates or commitments to this recommendation have been provided to date.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
August 16, 2017

Conduct department-wide technology and equipment audit

🔗

“Conduct a Department-wide technology and equipment audit to determine what equipment is outdated, broken, or otherwise in need of replacement, and develop a plan with timelines for repair or replacement of equipment as needed.”

  • August 16, 2017

    No updates or commitments to this recommendation have been provided to date.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
August 16, 2017

Increase officers’ access to employee supports and services

🔗

“Explore and evaluate other methods to increase officer access to employee supports and services, including how using those services can benefit CPD officers, and encourage officers to use these programs.”

  • August 16, 2017

    No updates or commitments to this recommendation have been provided to date.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
August 16, 2017

Track and publish better data on Police Board decisions

🔗

“Track and publish more detailed case-specific and aggregate data about Police Board decisions, and make this information available in a timely manner.”

  • August 15, 2017

    The Police Board publishes aggregate data in its monthly “blue book” reports, released during its public meetings and posted on its website. However, the data are difficult to find and in a format that makes comparisons and analysis difficult. The Police Board does not publish detailed case-specific information.
Agency responsible
  • Police Board
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
August 15, 2017

Develop cultural awareness training in collaboration with community members

🔗

“Work with community members from Chicago’s diverse racial, religious, ethnic, gender, and disability groups to create and deliver cultural awareness training in partnership with CPD, and to inform and suggest the development of additional measures that may improve police-community relations.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing. The panel recommended that community members be included both in drafting new training and as participants in scenario-based training on community policing and problem-solving techniques. The advisory panel’s recommendations will be open to public comment for 30 days. The draft calls for a final implementation plan to be presented by the superintendent in January 2018.
  • October 27, 2016

    In October 2016, Superintendent Eddie Johnson announced the creation of a Community Policing Advisory Panel, to include local and national experts on community policing and a handful of community representatives. The panel met for the first time in January 2017.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Develop specific policy prohibiting discriminatory policing

🔗

“Develop and implement a policy that specifically and comprehensively addresses and prohibits discriminatory policing and biased-based policing.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing. The recommendations did not include updating the written policy regarding bias-based policing to make it more comprehensive.
  • June 20, 2017

    CPD last changed its policy regarding racial profiling and bias-based policing in December 2015, the month the DOJ investigation began. It has not published any new policies that specifically and comprehensively address and prohibit discriminatory or bias-based policing.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Measure, evaluate and reward positive community engagement

🔗

“Measure, evaluate, and reward individual, supervisory, and agency performance on community engagement, problem-oriented-policing projects, and crime prevention.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing. The panel reported that 90 percent of officers they surveyed said the department only “somewhat or not at all” encouraged and rewarded officers for building relationships with the community. The panel recommended the creation of a deputy chief of community policing who would report directly to the superintendent and oversee implementation of community policing strategies throughout the department. The advisory panel’s recommendations will be open to public comment for 30 days. The draft calls for a final implementation plan to be presented by the superintendent within five months.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Increase opportunities for positive community interactions

🔗

“Increase opportunities for officers to have frequent, positive interactions with people outside of an enforcement context, especially groups and communities that have expressed a high level of distrust of police.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing. The panel suggested a group of community liaisons who could introduce new police officers to their districts of assignment and serve as “mentors” in the initial months of the assignment, with the aim of building stronger relationships of trust with the community. The advisory panel’s recommendations will be open to public comment for 30 days. The draft calls for a final implementation plan to be presented by the superintendent within five months.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Facilitate more opportunities for one-on-one interactions with residents

🔗

“Develop systems that encourage and facilitate opportunities for officers to actively engage with communities while on patrol and gain more familiarity with residents through one-on-one interactions.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing. The panel recommended additional opportunities for officer-community interactions while on patrol, but provided few specifics of what these interactions should look like. The advisory panel’s recommendations will be open to public comment for 30 days. The draft calls for a final implementation plan to be presented by the superintendent within five months.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Create district-level liaisons to minority communities

🔗

“Create liaison officers in each district that will be responsive to, and specifically address, the concerns of minority communities, including LGBTQ individuals, Muslims and other religious or ethnic minorities, individuals with limited English-proficiency, and individuals with disabilities. District liaison officers should have monthly meetings to coordinate Department-wide outreach efforts and strategies.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing. The panel recommended district-level liaisons to underrepresented communities “as needed.” The advisory panel’s recommendations will be open to public comment for 30 days. The draft calls for a final implementation plan to be presented by the superintendent within five months.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Incorporate community policing principles into training

🔗

“Incorporate community policing and problem-solving principles into Academy training, and require regular in-service training on topics such as procedural justice, de-escalation, bias-free policing, diversity and cultural sensitivity.”

  • August 9, 2017

    The superintendent’s Community Policing Advisory Panel released a draft of its recommendations for improving community policing, which include additional training for all department members. In surveys conducted by the advisory panel, 83 percent of police officers surveyed said they had received “little to no training at all” on community policing. The advisory panel’s recommendations will be open to public comment for 30 days. The draft calls for a final implementation plan to be presented by the superintendent within five months.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 9, 2017

Track, analyze and publish complaints of racial discrimination

🔗

“Capture and track complaints alleging racial and other bias-based profiling or discrimination, along with characteristics of the complainants. Analyze this data to identify and correct any patterns of discrimination.”

  • August 1, 2017

    In its annual and quarterly reports, COPA does not break down complaints by the characteristics of the complainants. In addition, although COPA reports the complaints opened by the type of complaint (e.g. excessive force, verbal abuse, etc.), and the complaints closed by outcome (e.g. sustained, exonerated, etc.), it does not report the complaints closed by both type and outcome. In other words, the way cases are currently reported, it is not possible to track whether allegations of racial or other biased-based policing are being sustained more or less often than before.
Agency responsible
  • COPA
Status
Not implemented
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
August 1, 2017

Improve training on detecting hate crimes

🔗

“Provide training to supervisors, detectives, and officers on how to detect and report potential hate crimes or hate incidents.”

  • July 26, 2017

    Chicago is on pace to record slightly more hate crimes in 2017 than in 2016, DNAinfo reported. But experts say the total number of reported hate crimes—39 from January through June—is still likely a significant undercount. The DOJ report noted that leaders in the transgender community were concerned about the lack of investigation of murders of transgender individuals as hate crimes. In the past nine months, there was not been a single report of a hate crime targeting a transgender person, according to the data published by DNAinfo, despite reports in February that two transgender women had been murdered since September 2016. CPD has not reported any new training on detecting or reporting hate crime incidents.
  • June 20, 2017

    CPD has not provided any new information regarding training on detection and reporting of hate crimes.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
July 26, 2017

Allow the Police Board to access more information about officers

🔗

“Modify CPD and IPRA policy, and address related provisions in the CBAs, to ensure that the Board has access to the information necessary to make fair and informed decisions.”

  • July 20, 2017

    The Police Board amended its rules of procedure to allow the superintendent’s lawyers to present “evidence in aggravation,” such as an officer’s negative disciplinary history, during a disciplinary hearing but only if the officer’s lawyers present his or her complementary disciplinary history as mitigating evidence. If this evidence is presented, then the board can consider it when determining if an officer is guilty of the charges presented.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • Police Board
  • Law Department
  • City Council
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
July 20, 2017

Ensure full and impartial investigation of all complaints

🔗

“Adopt practices to ensure the full and impartial investigation of all complaints, and assessment of patterns and trends related to those complaints.”

  • July 12, 2017

    In its report, the DOJ criticized the fact that IPRA does not even begin to investigate a complaint or interview until it has a signed affidavit, which impedes the ability of investigators to even discern whether a case is appropriate for an affidavit override. COPA’s draft policies do not specifically change this. In addition, the DOJ found that IPRA administratively closed, without investigation, complaints it did not deem “serious” enough, such as those of excessive force in connection with handcuffing, takedowns during an arrest, and displays of an officer’s gun. Similarly, BIA did not investigate complaints of verbal abuse by officers, instead referring them to district supervisors for non-disciplinary intervention. It is not clear if these policies have changed.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Unclear
Category
Accountability
Last updated
July 12, 2017

Assess Crisis Intervention Team program and CIT officer performance

🔗

“Implement an assessment program to evaluate the efficacy of the CIT program as a whole and the performance of individual CIT officers. A portion of a CIT officer’s performance review should address skill and effectiveness in CIT situations.”

  • July 12, 2017

    CPD has not announced a new assessment program for Crisis Intervention Team officers. The department hasn’t updated the CIT response policy since December 2016.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
July 12, 2017

Improve CPD’s physical training facilities and equipment

🔗

“Improve CPD’s physical training facilities and equipment.”

  • July 6, 2017

    CPD rolled out 40 new squad cars, part of a plan to replace 500 squad cars by early 2018.
  • July 3, 2017

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced plans to build a new $95 million training academy for both police and fire recruits in Garfield Park. Construction of the facility, which will be 30 acres and contain special areas for scenario-based training, is scheduled to start in 2018 and take at least two years to complete, DNAinfo reported. In the interim, the city announced a partnership with DeVry University and City Colleges of Chicago to use their facilities for promotion training and in-service training, freeing up more space at the current academy for recruit training.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Training
Last updated
July 6, 2017

Ensure proper staffing and resources for BIA and COPA

🔗

“Conduct a staffing analysis, and create a staffing plan based on that analysis, to ensure that both BIA and IPRA/COPA have the staffing and resources to perform their responsibilities effectively.”

  • June 30, 2017

    As of the end of June, COPA had filled 83 percent of its available positions, according to the agency’s quarterly report, including 80 of 87 investigative positions.
  • March 14, 2017

    In its March framework for reform, CPD noted that it had conducted a staffing analysis of BIA and planned to add one additional lieutenant and 10 additional sergeants to the unit. COPA is in the process of hiring its staff. When fully operational in September 2017, COPA will have 141 full-time employees; IPRA had 97 budgeted positions and was often not fully staffed.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 30, 2017

Implement training on engaging with diverse communities

🔗

“Develop and implement, with the help of community members from Chicago’s diverse groups, comprehensive recruit and in-service training to officers on how to establish formal partnerships and actively engage with diverse communities, to include understanding and building trust with minority communities, Muslim communities, immigrant and limited English-proficiency communities, persons with disabilities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.”

  • June 26, 2017

    Superintendent Eddie Johnson and Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced that all recruits will now visit the DuSable Museum of African American History in Washington Park, to help improve police officers’ understanding of black history and black communities. “Because violence most often affects those in disadvantaged neighborhoods, due in part to the disparity we desperately need to fix, we also find ourselves interacting more often than not with African-Americans and other people of color,” Johnson said, according to DNAinfo. “Many of you will start your careers in these areas, and it’s important you understand the history that created the conditions in those neighborhoods.”
  • May 2, 2017

    The Community Policing Advisory Panel held three community meetings in April and May, with the promise to incorporate comments from those meetings into a new community policing strategy.
  • October 27, 2016

    In October 2016, CPD Superintendent Eddie Johnson announced the creation of a Community Policing Advisory Panel, to include local and national experts on community policing and a handful of community representatives. The panel met for the first time in January 2017.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
June 26, 2017

Improve data collection for supervision of officers

🔗

“Ensure that data collection and tracking systems are adequate Department-wide to support this effort, and audit their use to ensure that these systems are used consistently and appropriately.”

  • June 23, 2017

    A spokeswoman for the city’s Department of Procurement Services wrote in an email that CPD and COPA enlisted Carminati Consulting Inc. to identify software for a new case management system and that the agencies decided on Column case management software, which is apparently already in use by Chicago’s OIG. (OIG Chief of Staff Karen R.H. Randolph is quoted on Column’s website praising their software.)
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to make efforts to improve its electronic centralized tracking system for complaints of misconduct. The department promised to initiate a competitive procurement process to obtain a new case management system by the first quarter of 2017.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Planned
Category
Supervision
Last updated
June 23, 2017

Provide safeguards for officers who report discriminatory policing

🔗

“Provide safeguards for officers who report bias-based profiling and other forms of discriminatory policing.”

  • June 20, 2017

    CPD has not provided any information regarding safeguards for whistleblower officers who report biased or discriminatory policing.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
June 20, 2017

Schedule promotional exams more frequently

🔗

“Schedule promotional exams with sufficient frequency to allow qualified candidates frequent opportunity for promotion throughout their careers.”

  • June 20, 2017

    CPD has not publicly announced any new promotional exams or a timeline for scheduling them.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Promotions
Last updated
June 20, 2017

Review validity and fairness of promotional exams

🔗

“Continue to review promotional exams to ensure they are valid and fairly administered.”

  • June 20, 2017

    CPD has not publicly announced a review of its promotional exams.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Promotions
Last updated
June 20, 2017

Enforce prohibition on false reports and testimony

🔗

“Enforce CPD policies prohibiting officers from falsifying reports and providing false information or testimony during interviews by providing strict disciplinary penalties, up to and including termination, for those officers who violate them.”

  • June 20, 2017

    BIA has not released any reports on the number of allegations of false reports, the number of those allegations that have been sustained, or the type of discipline recommended. So it is unclear whether these policies have been enforced differently since the DOJ report.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 20, 2017

Publish regular public reports on misconduct investigations

🔗

“Develop and implement policies mandating regular public reporting of misconduct investigations, including investigations handled not just by IPRA or COPA, but also BIA and the districts. These policies should cover regular reporting on complaint patterns and trends, investigation outcomes, and discipline (both recommended and imposed).”

  • June 19, 2017

    Of the various agencies that handle misconduct complaints, only IPRA has consistently released quarterly reports on the types of complaints initiated and the outcomes of those complaints. COPA’s draft rules and regulations mandate that summary reports of investigations, without names and personally identifiable information, will continue to be posted online “promptly after” the agency has issued its recommended discipline and the superintendent has agreed to it. However, these summary reports do not contain COPA’s discipline recommendations or the superintendent’s response. The agency has also pledged to continue to release quarterly reports and to revive the annual reports IPRA published before 2012.
    BIA still has not released its summary reports or any quarterly or annual reports. Laura Kunard, who in April was appointed deputy inspector general for public safety and is tasked with reviewing and auditing the entire police accountability system, has yet to publish any reports.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
  • Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
June 19, 2017

Hold supervisors accountable for failing to report misconduct

🔗

“Hold supervisors accountable if they fail to report misconduct that they observe, fail to accept and refer to IPRA a misconduct complaint, or otherwise fail to take appropriate steps to ensure officer accountability.”

  • June 19, 2017

    COPA and BIA have not released new data on how many supervisors have been disciplined for failing to report misconduct or failing to file a misconduct complaint.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Supervision
Last updated
June 19, 2017

Establish clear guidance on officer supervision

🔗

“Develop and implement policies that establish clear requirements and provide specific guidance to ensure the appropriate supervision of all officers.”

  • June 19, 2017

    CPD has not announced any new policies for supervisors, nor did the department pledge any new policies in its March framework for reform.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Supervision
Last updated
June 19, 2017

Increase transparency of Police Board

🔗

“Post all Police Board materials, including video recordings of hearings, on the Board’s website in a timely manner.”

  • June 16, 2017

    The Police Board publishes very limited case-specific information on its website. It does not post videos of hearings or other materials presented during hearings.
Agency responsible
  • Police Board
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 16, 2017

Change affidavit requirement and remove ban on anonymous civilian complaints

🔗

“Work with police unions to modify practices and procedures for accepting complaints to make it easier for individuals to register formal complaints about police conduct.”

  • June 16, 2017

    The city is in the process of renegotiating the collective bargaining agreements with the four unions representing officers and detectives, sergeants, lieutenants and captains. The union contracts currently prohibit the filing of anonymous complaints, require a signed affidavit to begin an investigation of a complaint (also enshrined in state law), and prohibit the investigation of a complaint concerning an incident more than five years old.
Agencies responsible
  • Law Department
  • Police Unions
  • City Council
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 16, 2017

Develop reporting system for Crisis Intervention Team deployments

🔗

“Develop a CIT reporting system (apart from the use-of-force reporting system) so that each deployment of a CIT officer is well documented. CIT officers should submit narrative reports of their interactions with persons in crisis so the appropriateness of the response can be evaluated in an after-action analysis.”

  • June 16, 2017

    CPD’s Crisis Intervention Team Response policy only requires CIT officers to file a CIT report on the interaction when no other report about the incident has been filed or when “unusual circumstances exist,” such as repeated calls from the same location. As the DOJ report noted, this means when an officer uses force against someone in a mental health crisis, only a Tactical Response Report (and not a CIT report) would be filed.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
June 16, 2017

Remove 24-hour rule for interviews following officer-involved shootings

🔗

“Revise CBA provisions or other restrictions on how soon officers may be interviewed following an officer-involved shooting.”

  • June 16, 2017

    CPD policy and the collective bargaining agreement with the police unions provide that the “shooting officer” in an officer-involved shooting has 24 hours before he or she can be required to give a statement to COPA. The city is in the process of renegotiating the CBAs, a process that takes place out of public view and is not yet complete.
Agencies responsible
  • Law Department
  • Police Unions
  • City Council
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
June 16, 2017

Get input from community members about data to collect and disseminate

🔗

“Seek input from community members regarding the type of data and information they believe is important for CPD and IPRA to disseminate.”

  • June 14, 2017

    In June, COPA invited a select group of journalists and reform advocates who regularly request data from the agency (including The Chicago Reporter) to a session where we were invited to provide input on what data COPA should regularly collect and publish on its website. However, COPA said it did not plan to invite a broader cross-section of community members to provide similar input. To date, CPD has not publicized an event seeking community input regarding the type of information they believe should be disseminated.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD said in March it would “continue its community engagement to increase its data/information collection and public information sharing,” but provided few specifics.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
June 14, 2017

Increase OIG oversight of merit promotions

🔗

“Continue, and potentially increase, oversight of the merit promotions process through the Chicago Office of the Inspector General, and ensure that the OIG’s role in overseeing this process is communicated to both officers and the public.”

  • June 9, 2017

    The January announcement on increasing transparency around merit promotions made no reference to increasing the inspector general’s role in oversight. The new deputy inspector general for public safety, who was approved by City Council in April, has not yet released any reports.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • Deputy Inspector General for Public Safety
Status
Not implemented
Category
Promotions
Last updated
June 9, 2017

Strengthen selection criteria for Police Board members and hearing officers

🔗

“Ensure selection criteria for Police Board members and hearing officers include requisite competence, impartiality, and expertise.”

  • June 9, 2017

    In June, the Police Board posted a job opening for a new hearing officer. The criteria included “extensive trial experience, an in-depth knowledge of the law and procedure, excellent oral- and written-communication skills, and an ability to present complex legal and factual issues clearly and impartially to the Board members.” It did not include impartiality or expertise in the area of police misconduct. Police Board members continue to be mayoral appointees; there are no required qualifications for Police Board members.
Agency responsible
  • Police Board
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 9, 2017

Enforce department rules on racist and discriminatory language

🔗

“Enforce Department rules regarding appropriate language, respect, and social media use.”

  • June 8, 2017

    CPD has not released any new policies regarding appropriate language or social media use.
    COPA has not released data to show whether it has more strictly enforced allegations regarding verbal abuse, which includes racist and discriminatory language.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Unclear
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
June 8, 2017

Increase transparency of police misconduct lawsuit settlements

🔗

“Develop and implement policies that would increase transparency related to City settlements of police misconduct complaints.”

  • June 8, 2017

    The city’s law and finance departments have continued to resist analyzing police misconduct lawsuits for trends and patterns, or making detailed information about the lawsuits public. This despite the fact that their excuse for not doing so had previously been that they were waiting for the DOJ to recommend it—which the DOJ has now done.
Agency responsible
  • Law Department
Status
Not implemented
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
June 8, 2017

Discipline officers for failing to report uses of force

🔗

“Discipline or otherwise hold accountable officers who fail to accurately report their own uses of force, officers who fail to accurately report another officer’s use of force when policy requires it, and supervisors who fail to conduct adequate force investigations.”

  • June 8, 2017

    CPD and IPRA have not yet released data showing how many officers have been accused of failing to properly report uses of force under the new policy or how many have been disciplined for it.
Agency responsible
  • COPA
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
June 8, 2017

Create a cadre of attorneys to represent COPA before the Police Board

🔗

“Create a cadre of trained and experienced attorneys within IPRA/COPA to advocate before the Board.”

  • June 7, 2017

    Currently the superintendent is represented in Police Board hearings by attorneys from the city law department. COPA, unlike similar civilian oversight agencies across the country, has no direct representation before the Police Board.
Agencies responsible
  • COPA
  • Law Department
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 7, 2017

Move Police Board’s civilian oversight duties to another entity

🔗

“Consider moving the Police Board’s police commission and civilian oversight duties to another entity (such as a Community Oversight Board), to allow the Police Board to focus on its critical function of reviewing Superintendent/IPRA misconduct and disciplinary findings.”

  • June 7, 2017

    At a City Council committee meeting in June, CPD’s deputy director for community relations told an alderman she was “not qualified to answer” his question about why a community oversight board had yet to be created, The Daily Line reported. Since last fall, a group of community organizations has been working on coming up with a proposal for what was supposed to be the third prong of the city’s new police accountability framework. But there has yet to be any movement.
Agencies responsible
  • Police Board
  • City Council
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 7, 2017

Require BIA to record interviews and include transcripts in every file

🔗

“Revise BIA policies and procedures to require that investigators record interviews and include transcripts of all interviews with victims, witnesses, or suspect officers in every file. CPD policy should dictate that summaries of interviews will be accepted only where obtaining a recorded or transcribed interview is not feasible.”

  • June 7, 2017

    CPD’s policy regarding the conduct of complaint investigations, updated in June 2017, states that investigations of wrongdoing may be audio-recorded “as necessary,” which is unchanged from previous versions. It does not require investigators to audio-record interviews or to include transcripts of all interviews in every file.
  • March 14, 2017

    In its March framework for reform, CPD noted that it had purchased audio recorders for use in BIA interviews, and had developed a special order regarding the use of these recorders in BIA interviews.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
June 7, 2017

Prohibit officers and witnesses from viewing camera footage before COPA interviews

🔗

“Consider prohibiting involved officers, witness officers, and civilians from viewing footage from dashboard cameras, body cameras, surveillance cameras, or cell phones before their interview with IPRA. In all cases, inquire of witnesses and officers whether they have viewed any recordings prior to the interview.”

  • June 6, 2017

    The department and COPA have not released any policies prohibiting officers from viewing video footage. The city’s collective bargaining agreements with the police unions give investigators the option of whether to show video of an incident to an officer who is under investigation. However, the contracts state that an officer cannot be charged with a Rule 14 violation—lying—unless he or she has been given an opportunity to view any video of an incident and amend his or her original statement. The city is in the process of renegotiating these contracts, a process that takes place out of public view.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
  • Police Unions
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
June 6, 2017

Formalize the creation of a CPD training committee

🔗

“Formalize CPD’s creation of a training committee in CPD policies, including outlining the committee’s goals, membership, responsibilities, and deliverables.”

  • May 19, 2017

    In May, the superintendent formalized the creation of a training oversight committee, which will be chaired by the first deputy superintendent and will meet monthly. The committee will have four permanent subcommittees to oversee recruit training, in-service training, field training and promotional training. It will set overarching priorities and policies regarding training.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Implemented
Category
Training
Last updated
May 19, 2017

Ensure supervisors closely monitor officers

🔗

“Ensure that supervisors closely monitor officers under their command, review officer uses of force, and direct and guide officers to use force only where necessary, in a manner that is safe, and that comports with the principles and values set forth in CPD’s revised force policies.”

  • May 17, 2017

    CPD’s new use of force policies provided new, stricter guidelines for supervisory review of use of force. But there have been no new changes to ensure that supervisors “direct and guide officers to use force only when necessary.” And the use of force policy has not been formally adopted into the department’s directives.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Supervision
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Require interviews in immediate aftermath of officer-involved shootings to be recorded

🔗

“Require that interviews with involved officers and witness officers be recorded and IPRA investigators be present (except that an officer may speak with his or her attorney in private) and that interviews with civilian witnesses be recorded unless it would interfere with investigation. In cases where interviews are not recorded, the reason for failing to record the interview should be documented.”

  • May 17, 2017

    In the immediate aftermath of an officer-involved shooting, the CPD commander in charge interviews the involved officers and witnesses at the scene to conduct a preliminary assessment of the incident. This is often done before IPRA investigators arrive—or while they are waiting outside of the crime scene tape—and these conversations are not recorded, according to the DOJ report. The CPD General Order that dictates the initial response to fatal officer-involved shootings has not been updated since March 2016, before the DOJ report was published. Neither the General Order nor the updated Use of Force policy, adopted in May, requires preliminary interviews by the CPD commander in charge on the scene to be recorded.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Prohibit involved officers from using cellphones after officer-involved shootings

🔗

“Except to the extent necessary to ensure public safety, prohibit involved officers and witness officers from using cell phones before they speak with the on-scene commander.”

  • May 17, 2017

    The initial response to fatal officer-involved shootings is dictated by CPD General Order 03-06. The General Order has not been updated since March 2016, before the DOJ report was published. CPD’s new use of force policy, approved in May, and COPA’s draft rules and regulations, released in April, similarly fail to incorporate the above recommendation.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Develop higher-level, interdisciplinary review of uses of force

🔗

“Develop and implement a system for higher-level, inter-disciplinary review of incidents involving all types of firearms discharges, successful canine deployments, Taser uses, use of chemical weapons, and force resulting in injury to the person against whom force was used.”

  • May 17, 2017

    CPD’s new policy requires higher-level supervisors to complete a new Tactical Response Report-Investigation (TRR-I), which asks them to interview the subject of any use of force, review the TRR filed by the officer, and document any other investigatory information or observations. The TRR-I must be reviewed and approved by the newly created Force Review Unit. CPD also reinstated the Force Review Panel, comprising chiefs from each of the major bureaus, to review shootings and other incidents of deadly force within seven days of the incident to determine if any policy, training or equipment changes should be made. The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Require narratives on use of force reports

🔗

“Develop and implement use-of-force reporting requiring officers to complete a narrative force report that describes with particularity the force used and the circumstances necessitating that level of force, including the reason for the initial stop or other enforcement action. Witness officers should also complete reports for serious uses of force (e.g., firearms discharges and other forms of deadly force). Injuries to officers and persons against whom force was used should be photographed.”

  • May 17, 2017

    CPD updated its policy regarding use of force reporting and the Tactical Response Report (TRR), which officers must use to document uses of force. The new TRR form requires officers to describe, with specificity, the use of force incident, the subject’s actions, the officer’s response, and any force mitigation efforts used. The policy also requires supervisors to request that an evidence technician take photographs of any injuries to the officer or subject. However, the policy does not require witness officers to file separate reports on serious uses of force. The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Equip and train officers in first aid

🔗

“Equip officers with appropriate first-aid supplies, train them in their use, and require officers to render aid to injured persons consistent with the officer’s training.”

  • May 17, 2017

    The revised use of force policy says officers “may provide appropriate medical care consistent with their training,” but it doesn’t require them to do so. Only about 1,000 of CPD’s 12,000 officers have taken the Law Enforcement Medical and Rescue Training Course (LEMART), the Chicago Reader reported in October 2016. CPD has not provided updated figures. The DOJ was also highly critical of the fact that CPD does not provide officers with first-aid supplies, instead requiring officers to buy them out of pocket. In 2016, the Chicago Police Foundation, a nonprofit unaffiliated with the department, began raising money for emergency first-aid kits with the goal of donating 2,000 first-aid kits over the next four years. There is no evidence that CPD is providing these for their officers.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Prohibit retaliatory force

🔗

“Prohibit the use of retaliatory force, force used as punishment, force used in response to the exercise of protected First Amendment activities (e.g., filming), and force used in response to speech only rather than in response to an immediate threat.”

  • May 17, 2017

    CPD’s revised use of force policy specifically prohibits the use of force as punishment or retaliation, based on bias, or in response to a person’s “lawful exercise of First Amendment rights.” (However, the policy also notes that “First Amendment rights are not absolute and are subject to reasonable time, place, manner restrictions.”) The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Revise Taser policies consistent with best practices

🔗

“Revise Taser policies consistent with best practices, including implementing restrictions on the use of Tasers in drive-stun mode; limitations on Taser use in situations that pose inordinate risk to the suspect; limitations on Taser use on vulnerable people (e.g., the elderly, pregnant women, people in mental health crisis); restrictions on Taser use to situations in which it is necessary and proportional to the threat or resistance of the subject; and discouragement of the use of Tasers in schools and on students, and requiring officers to factor into their decision to use a Taser a child’s apparent age, size, and the threat presented for proportionality and appropriateness. CPD should emphasize in training that Tasers are weapons with inherent risks that inflict significant pain and should not be viewed as tools of convenience.”

  • May 17, 2017

    CPD revised its Taser use policy to incorporate most of the DOJ’s recommendations, including prohibiting the use of Tasers in drive-stun mode, in which the Taser is pressed against a person’s body to cause potentially debilitating pain, and limiting their use against children, pregnant women, the elderly, and others who may be at greater risk for serious death or injury. The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Reinforce policy prohibiting shooting at or from moving vehicles

🔗

“Revise and reinforce policies against shooting at or from a moving vehicle, and provide additional training on avoiding dangerous vehicle maneuvers.”

  • May 17, 2017

    CPD put in place a new policy in February 2015 that more strongly prohibited firing at or into moving vehicles. But the DOJ review found cases after that policy change in which officers still fired at moving vehicles. “Absent accountability for violations, the 2015 revisions do not adequately address or resolve the unconstitutional pattern or practice,” the DOJ wrote. CPD’s revised use of force policy, released in May, specifically notes that officers should “make every effort to move out of the path of the vehicle.” The policy has not yet been formally adopted into the department directives.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
May 17, 2017

Provide incentives and rewards for effective supervision

🔗

“Incentivize and reward supervisors who provide close and effective supervision.”

  • May 4, 2017

    CPD added a new award for members of the honor guard, but has not added an award for effective supervision.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Supervision
Last updated
May 4, 2017

Explore alternative methods for providing officer support

🔗

“Explore alternative methods for providing officer support, including anonymous support hotlines and group meetings.”

  • May 1, 2017

    At a City Council subject matter hearing on officer mental health, Michelle Langlois, a social worker at the Jesse Brown VA Hospital, offered to work with CPD to develop an anonymous suicide hotline like the one they offer to veterans. It is unclear if the department has taken her up on the offer, or explored any other alternative methods for providing officers with support.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
May 1, 2017

Expand the Employee Assistance Program

🔗

“Expand the Employee Assistance Program by hiring additional counselors, substance abuse specialists, and other staff with specialized training and skills in certain topics, including post-traumatic stress disorder, domestic violence, women’s issues, and depression.”

  • May 1, 2017

    In a May subject matter hearing on officer mental health, Dr. Rob Sobo, CPD’s director for professional counseling services, told aldermen his office had just three licensed clinicians, two drug and alcohol counselors and zero psychiatrists, the Daily Line reported. He said they were working on hiring more, but didn’t give a time frame or a number of additional counselors they plan to hire.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD committed in March to conducting a review of the support services available to officers and, with officer and expert input, developing a plan for enhancing officer support. But the department offered only the vague promise that the plan would include “continued provision of and enhancements to the Employee Assistance program,” with no concrete promises for additional staff or resources.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Officer Wellness and Safety
Last updated
May 1, 2017

Implement an effective early-intervention system

🔗

“Commit to putting in place a new and fully integrated EIS system that will allow for early identification of problematic behavior trends and appropriate interventions, and involve all relevant stakeholders in the process early on to ensure its ultimate success.”

  • April 26, 2017

    Since spring 2016, CPD has been working with the University of Chicago Crime Lab to develop an early intervention system. In April 2017, The Joyce Foundation announced a one-year, $200,000 grant to help support this work.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Planned
Category
Supervision
Last updated
April 26, 2017

Revise COPA mediation policies and procedures

🔗

“Revise IPRA/COPA mediation policies and procedures to: 1) require complainant notification of and participation in mediation; 2) incorporate principles of restorative justice; 3) create clear, objective standards for referring cases to mediation; and 4) prohibit mediation for resolving certain categories of complaints, including use of force and domestic violence complaints.”

  • April 12, 2017

    COPA’s draft rules and regulations, published in April, outline specific categories of complaints for which mediation will not be used, including use of force and domestic violence complaints “involving physical abuse or threats of physical abuse.” However, COPA’s draft mediation policy does not require complainant notification of and participation in mediation, incorporate principles of restorative justice, or create clear and objective standards for referring cases to mediation, as recommended by the DOJ.
Agency responsible
  • COPA
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
April 12, 2017

Conduct BIA and COPA investigations concurrently with criminal inquiries

🔗

“CPD and IPRA should develop appropriate protocols to conduct concurrent, bifurcated investigations with specific measures to ensure that the integrity of criminal investigations is not compromised.”

  • April 12, 2017

    COPA’s draft rules and regulations, released in April 2017, require investigations into officer-involved shootings to proceed concurrently with any federal or state criminal investigation “in a manner that avoids impacting the related criminal investigation.” However, COPA may delay issuing its findings until the criminal investigation is completed. These draft rules have not yet been adopted.
  • March 21, 2017

    CPD said it would develop and administer training to Bureau of Internal Affairs (BIA) investigators on conducting investigations concurrently with any criminal investigations.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
April 12, 2017

Require earlier COPA involvement in officer-involved shootings

🔗

“Adopt a policy requiring that IPRA investigators participate in the preliminary assessment during the immediate aftermath of an officer-involved shooting to the same extent as the CPD commander in charge and CPD investigators conducting administrative or criminal investigations.”

  • April 12, 2017

    COPA’s draft rules and regulations, published in April 2017, explain that COPA investigators “will seek access to the scene of the incident once Department personnel have secured the scene,” and will confer with CPD personnel on scene about conducting concurrent investigations.
    However, IPRA’s first-quarter 2017 report noted that it took, on average, 58 minutes for CPD to notify IPRA of an officer-involved shooting in which someone was hit, making it difficult for the agency to respond swiftly and to participate in the preliminary assessment of the shooting.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
April 12, 2017

Formally adopt 90-day video release policy

🔗

“Finalize and formally adopt, as part of CPD and IPRA policy, the video release policy, with consideration of expanding the universe of complaints the policy covers.”

  • April 10, 2017

    COPA’s draft rules and regulations incorporate the policy that all videos and recordings will be released within 60 days of the date of the incident, or for an additional 30 days if requested. However, the same month the draft rules were released, the city, at the request of the Cook County state’s attorney, agreed to withhold a video of a police shooting beyond the 90-day limit set out in the city’s initial policy. COPA’s draft policy does not provide any guidance on requests for additional delays from outside entities. The draft policy has not yet been finalized.
Agencies responsible
  • CPD
  • COPA
Status
Partially implemented
Category
Data Collection and Transparency
Last updated
April 10, 2017

Improve merit promotion process

🔗

“Review and revise, as necessary, the merit promotion process, to ensure that policies and procedures are followed, and that the system is working as intended.”

  • March 24, 2017

    CPD revised the standard operating procedure for merit promotions, but the changes made were minor and did not fundamentally change the merit promotion process, by which officers are promoted based not on test scores, but on the nomination of a supervisor.
  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to develop and document a standard operating procedure for the merit selection process.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Promotions
Last updated
March 24, 2017

Provide supervisory training on addressing discriminatory policing

🔗

“Provide training to supervisors and commanders on detecting and addressing bias-based profiling and other forms of discriminatory policing.”

  • March 14, 2017

    CPD pledged in March to continue to provide Procedural Justice 1 and Procedural Justice 2 training modules to all officers, supervisors and command staff, and to develop a third Procedural Justice training course, that it would begin pilot testing in 2018. It is not clear if a separate training specifically for supervisors has been developed or implemented.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Community Policing
Last updated
March 14, 2017

Revise end-of-course Academy evaluations

🔗

“Revise end-of-course Academy evaluations to ensure recruits graduate the Academy with sufficient knowledge and skill to police safely and lawfully.”

  • March 14, 2017

    In March, the Chicago Tribune reported that more than 97 percent of recruits graduated from the Academy over a recent four-year period, much higher than at similar departments across the country. In response to the article, CPD did not commit to implementing more stringent graduation requirements, nor did it do so in its framework for reform, released the same day in March.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Training
Last updated
March 14, 2017

Ensure timely investigations of administrative charges

🔗

“Put systems in place that ensure administrative charges are fully and timely investigated, even where CPD and the State’s Attorney’s Office are investigating potential criminal charges, or have decided not to pursue criminal charges, for the same conduct.”

  • March 14, 2017

    In March, CPD committed to training BIA investigators in conducting administrative investigations concurrently with criminal investigations, but did not mention any new systems to ensure that parallel investigations are conducted “fully and timely.” It is also not clear yet if that training has occurred.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Accountability
Last updated
March 14, 2017

Ensure sufficient training staff and resources for Crisis Intervention Team training

🔗

“Improve the quality of the current CIT 40-hour training program, which will in turn require obtaining sufficient CIT training staff and resources so that training can focus on requiring CIT candidates to demonstrate competency in the necessary skills.”

  • March 14, 2017

    The DOJ noted that CPD has just three people dedicated to running the CIT program, down from nine in 2008-09. CPD pledged in March to devote additional staff and resources to the CIT program, but it did not mention any changes to the CIT training program.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Unclear
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
March 14, 2017

Require CIT officers to respond to mental health calls

🔗

“Require that, wherever possible, at least one [Crisis Intervention Team] officer will respond to any situation concerning individuals in mental health crisis or with I/DD where force might be used.”

  • March 14, 2017

    The DOJ noted that the Office of Emergency Management and Communication had developed a system to better identify CIT calls and CIT officers available for dispatch. But there is still no requirement that at least one CIT-trained officer will respond to a situation with an individual in a mental health crisis.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Use of Force
Last updated
March 14, 2017

Maximize supervisor time spent on mentorship and oversight

🔗

“Re-examine the responsibilities of supervisory staff at districts to allow supervisors to maximize time spent providing mentorship, oversight, and accountability of officer activities.”

  • March 3, 2017

    CPD updated the directives outlining the responsibilities of district supervisors, including district field sergeants and watch operations lieutenants. The new directives require a watch operations lieutenant to be on duty at all times and require district field sergeants to document both positive and negative observations about their subordinates at least once a month.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Implemented
Category
Supervision
Last updated
March 3, 2017

Revise disciplinary matrix to provide better guidance

🔗

“Revise CPD’s disciplinary matrix to ensure that it provides meaningful guidance to those making disciplinary recommendations and findings.”

  • February 1, 2017

    CPD implemented a new disciplinary matrix, which sets broad guidelines for discipline based on the infraction, but failed to take into account the DOJ’s specific recommendations for changes, according to the Chicago Tribune. The DOJ said the matrix, which was already in draft form when the report came out in January, “fails to provide clear guidelines on appropriate, fair, and consistent penalty ranges, thus undermining the legitimacy and deterrent effect of discipline within CPD.” The DOJ criticized the fact that adherence to the matrix was not mandatory, that some discipline ranges seemed incongruent with the offense (such as a possible one-day suspension for using a racial or ethnic slur), and that language about when decision-makers could diverge from the matrix guidelines was too vague. None of these shortcomings were fixed in CPD’s final matrix.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Not implemented
Category
Accountability
Last updated
February 1, 2017

Increase transparency around merit promotion process

🔗

“Develop mechanisms for improving transparency regarding those who receive merit promotions, and the reasons those candidates were selected.”

  • January 23, 2017

    CPD spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said the department would publish the list of merit promotions on an internal CPD website, and also identify the supervisor who promoted them. The information will not be posted on the CPD’s public website, according to the Sun-Times.
Agency responsible
  • CPD
Status
Implemented
Category
Promotions
Last updated
January 23, 2017

Methodology

Using the city’s public statements, our own reporting and that of other news organizations, the Reporter categorized each recommendation based on the following rubric:

  • Implemented: The recommendation made by the DOJ has been largely or completely put into place.
  • Partially implemented: The city has substantially begun the work of implementation or has implemented part of the recommendation.
  • Planned: The city has announced plans or taken some steps toward implementing this recommendation, but has not made substantial progress.
  • Not implemented: It is clear from publicly available information that the city has not put into place any part of the recommendation.
  • Unclear: There is not enough public information available to confirm whether or not the recommendation has been implemented.

The Reporter provided its categorizations to the Chicago Police Department and the Civilian Office of Police Accountability, and reached out to the Mayor’s Office for comment. Statuses were only changed if the agency provided concrete, public information showing that a recommendation had been miscategorized.

The Reporter also consulted experts in the field of police accountability and reform, including Christy Lopez, a former deputy chief of the Special Litigation Section of the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division, who worked on the type of police pattern and practice investigation conducted in Chicago.

Credits

Database reporter Jonah Newman reported the status of the Department of Justice recommendations. Data visualization fellow Geoff Hing developed the tracker application. The fellowship was funded by a grant from the Chicago Headline Club.

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